Author Topic: Rose cuttings  (Read 295 times)

Offline wonky

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Rose cuttings
« on: March 25, 2015, 01:15:17 PM »
I saw this on facebook and presume it is serious! Presumably if the method is genuine it could have other applications?

Rose cuttings are planted and many of them do not germinate. The potato has high moisture content allowing the cutting to take more easily. (This is a rough translation of the original comment that was in Portuguese)

Wonky.

Offline aftermidnight

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Re: Rose cuttings
« Reply #1 on: March 25, 2015, 05:19:32 PM »
This I have just got to try, do you get a feed of potatoes too  ThU:-)
Annette

Offline scary crow

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Re: Rose cuttings
« Reply #2 on: March 25, 2015, 07:15:48 PM »
« Last Edit: March 25, 2015, 08:48:05 PM by scary crow »

Offline wonky

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Re: Rose cuttings
« Reply #3 on: March 25, 2015, 08:19:06 PM »
Hi Scary you've missed www from the front of your link!

Offline scary crow

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Re: Rose cuttings
« Reply #4 on: March 25, 2015, 08:50:04 PM »
Hi Scary you've missed www from the front of your link!

OOPs sorted now thanks Wonky for that im wearing gees tight hat stopped the blood flow to my brain  lol(1)

Offline wonky

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Re: Rose cuttings
« Reply #5 on: March 25, 2015, 10:02:58 PM »
Whilst you have that hat of G's it might be a good idea to lose it! More trouble than its worth I reckon  lol(1)

Offline Big Gee

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Re: Rose cuttings
« Reply #6 on: March 26, 2015, 08:08:52 PM »
Hi Scary you've missed www from the front of your link!

OOPs sorted now thanks Wonky for that im wearing gees tight hat stopped the blood flow to my brain  lol(1)

While the cat's away the mice will play!!  Angry:-{

Well the big ginger tom is back 'crow' and catching up with everything that's been posted since he was away - there will be a heap of black feathers floating around if I get my paws on you!!

Roses are usually grafted on rootstock - just like apple scions and for the same reason. Rose cuttings can be rooted but you run the risk of disease susceptibility in the root part. I would suggest you hone your grafting skills and put your rose 'scions' on disease resistant rootstock, which is usually closely related to native wild dogrose that's as tough as old boots and is very disease resistant. When grafting roses, one plant (the rootstock) is usually selected because of its hardy, healthy roots, and the other, referred to as the "scion", is selected for its blossoms. The scion tissues contain the genes for the traits that the gardener hopes to duplicate as a result of the grafting process, such as colour or fragrance. Grafting roses is not difficult, but it does often require a little patience and practice.

You can use spuds to help keep your cutting moist, but having said that, roses will root very easily in most mediums as long as they are kept moist, so I think using spuds is a bit of overkill really, but hey! Don't let me stop you experimenting!

Here's a bit more info.:

<iframe width="640" height="385" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/sqA9jG6QUvk?fs=1&start=" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

And here's a video showing a rose 'scion' graft:

<iframe width="640" height="385" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/Y_k1wwcluAs?fs=1&start=" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>