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Author Topic: Kefir - not as we know it  (Read 123 times)

Btoe

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Kefir - not as we know it
« on: July 16, 2014, 01:13:45 PM »

Thought that I'd share this wee gem with the kefir makers...You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login

I only hope it doesn't spark Big Gee into a rage  lol(1)
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Poppa Tommo

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Re: Kefir - not as we know it
« Reply #1 on: July 16, 2014, 01:37:53 PM »

FYI
I pay 1.40 for a litre of registered and tested unpasteurised goats milk from a local farm. That's 14p for 100ml. Compared to 59.2 per 100ml from Ocado at their reduced price.

To use common parlance that is a no-brainer

If you use cows milk then it is even cheaper.
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Big Gee

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Re: Kefir - not as we know it
« Reply #2 on: July 16, 2014, 02:14:47 PM »

Who? ME?

Not a bit of it. It takes a lot more than that to spark me off Btoe! 'Cucumber Celt' they call me in my home town!!!    Grin2:-)

You can put any links you like on here - as long as they don't encourage our members to go elsewhere for their gardening chats on a permanent basis.

I'm sure I could get 'organic' full cream goat's milk around here as well for much less than that Btoe. In fact goats are quite cheap to buy as kids! Tommo will give you a few tips on milking one!!  CW ;-)



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Poppa Tommo

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Re: Kefir - not as we know it
« Reply #3 on: July 16, 2014, 04:32:25 PM »

Simple...make friends with it and don't stand at the arse end!
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Big Gee

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Re: Kefir - not as we know it
« Reply #4 on: July 16, 2014, 08:57:38 PM »

But it's from the 'arse end' that you traditionally milk goats Tommo! They don't work so well from the side - as you would with a cow.
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Poppa Tommo

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Re: Kefir - not as we know it
« Reply #5 on: July 16, 2014, 10:10:52 PM »

Not in my goat milking days, Gee. I was taught to lean in with your left ear on the side and milk away. It's the hand action, a sort of peristaltic motion, unlike that used for cows, that works best. Stand at the back and expect to be booted with the milk bucket being kicked away.
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Btoe

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Re: Kefir - not as we know it
« Reply #6 on: July 16, 2014, 10:51:09 PM »

Wow, I learn something new here every day guys, think I'll leave the coo and goat milking to the profeesionals lol(1) Might have to give the goats milk a try though chrs:-)
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Big Gee

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Re: Kefir - not as we know it
« Reply #7 on: July 16, 2014, 11:14:23 PM »

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Not in my goat milking days, Gee. I was taught to lean in with your left ear on the side and milk away. It's the hand action, a sort of peristaltic motion, unlike that used for cows, that works best. Stand at the back and expect to be booted with the milk bucket being kicked away.

Must vary from place to place. When my mother used to milk the goat she did it from the back, when I asked as a child - why? And not from the side as she milked the cows, she just said "that's the way God meant for you to milk goats - that's why he gave them a short tail!"

She'd milked cows and goats from the age of 9. We would sometimes help her with the cows, but the goat would always be reserved for her - as it would only allow her to do it. Watching mam milking was always good fun - she always sang or whistled whilst doing it because it made them more relaxed and they gave their milk easier she reckoned. The cats would line up on the cowshed doorstep & she would aim a squirt at them in turn, that they had learnt to open their mouth for! Quite a circus act. In the summer when we only milked one cow for milk for the house (the calves suckled the others) she would go into the field with her beret on, a three legged milking stool and a bucket. The cow would leave the others & come to her to be milked out in the open. Wonderful days . . . .
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Poppa Tommo

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Re: Kefir - not as we know it
« Reply #8 on: July 17, 2014, 08:16:26 AM »

Wonderful, even halcyon, days indeed. I started when I was about 14. I think I mentioned back in March in the Kefir department that my mother had developed a serious bout of eczyma and that, on the advice of a friend, she had taken to goats milk as a remedy. Well my father, always going in obsession mode, decided there and then that we needed a goat.

Well off we went to this goat farm about 8 miles away (which, incidentally, I ended up cycling to and working on every Saturday) where a nanny was for sale. We were all shown how to milk her but for some reason she only had eyes for me and wouldn't let the others near her. So that was it. I was goat milking man from that moment on. Twice a day every day.

At the goat farm all the goats were milked by hand by Winky (yep, her real name) and her partner, Penny and they both did it from the side. I don't think it is a regional thing you just do what works for you and the goats. I used to love milking ours, called Lady, because if I rested my left ear into her side (always her left side for milking) I could hear her heart beat and loads of other gurgling sounds.

When it came time to have her mated (gotta do that to keep them lactating) my dad would turn up at my school with the van, the head would come into class and say "Mr. Waterhouse, you are needed at home, your goat needs mating". This would indeed raise a giggle that would travel round the class, with a few knowing looks (especially from the lads who kept sheep!  ;) )

Well the remedy for mother's eczyma worked a treat but we kept Lady on for a good few years after that.

Living in a rural community there was no shortage of browsing space for her and I used to stake her out on a 30metre chain, after the morning milking, near to a delicious hedgerow for the day. Every day she knew exactly what time my bus delivered me back from school and there she would be trotting down the road with her chain clanking behind her bleating a greeting to me.

My dad made her a small lean to goat shed which I was responsible for clearing and replacing bedding. When you get to know them nanny goats are very affectionate ceatures that love a bit of company and many a time mother would find me asleep next to the goat in her shed.
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