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Author Topic: Many thanks King Tommy!  (Read 242 times)

Big Gee

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Many thanks King Tommy!
« on: April 14, 2014, 09:47:18 PM »

I got the Kefir 'grains' this morning Tommy. They arrived in perfect condition & now they're doing their stuff in a big beaker with a pint of full cream milk in it! Can't wait till tomorrow to try it out.

THANKS mate!

 YRTB
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Poppa Tommo

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Re: Many thanks King Tommy!
« Reply #1 on: April 14, 2014, 10:35:27 PM »

You, sir, are most welcome. May you have a long and happy relationship with your Kefir.
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scary crow

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Re: Many thanks King Tommy!
« Reply #2 on: April 16, 2014, 08:49:11 PM »

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I got the Kefir 'grains' this morning Tommy. They arrived in perfect condition & now they're doing their stuff in a big beaker with a pint of full cream milk in it! Can't wait till tomorrow to try it out.

THANKS mate!

 YRTB
Well come on then what did it taste like ? did you like it ?
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Big Gee

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Re: Many thanks King Tommy!
« Reply #3 on: April 16, 2014, 09:27:54 PM »

Just got discharged from hospital!  spf:-(

ONLY JOKING - you have to try it Scary it's lush (as my granddaughters would say). It's like a smooth thick but liquid yoghurt after a day of fermenting. I've got my second batch to drink now before I go to bed. It might be my imagination but I felt full of energy today - knackered now though!

It actually makes me feel chilled out after I drink it. Between that & the Kombucha I think I may have cracked it! You MUST try it.
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scary crow

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Re: Many thanks King Tommy!
« Reply #4 on: April 16, 2014, 09:55:02 PM »

Well good to hear that you liked it BG ...I couldent even taste it i hate yoghurt have seen the pics of kefir looked like congealed animal fat to me i,ll stick with the kombucha thanks ...
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Poppa Tommo

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Re: Many thanks King Tommy!
« Reply #5 on: April 16, 2014, 10:07:05 PM »

I don't know about 'scary crow' more like 'Scaredy Crow'.

My wife does that - decides she doesn't like something just because it looks 'ugly'.

Might be the best thing you ever tried.

As you will have read, BG, kefir is believed to come from the Turkish 'keif' which means 'good feeling'. Works for me every morning and sets me up for the day.

I'm really glad that your are bonding with it.

With kefir and Kombucha forming a two-fold part of my daily diet I rarely suffer from the usual cold/flu type viruses and other common ailments and generally enjoy rude health.
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scary crow

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Re: Many thanks King Tommy!
« Reply #6 on: April 16, 2014, 10:18:40 PM »

 what:-{  Not scaredy crow just not into yoghurty things dont even drink milk unless it,s in tea and only have one or two cups of that a day always just been a H2o drinker and kombucha now ...
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Big Gee

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Re: Many thanks King Tommy!
« Reply #7 on: April 16, 2014, 10:55:30 PM »

Now you listen to me you whimpish crow! With your allergies you might find a real cure if you cleaned up your gut. I know Kombucha does it, but believe me this stuff is yet another chapter in the book of health!

I was talking to my No 3 son Alex about it tonight on the phone - he suffers with psoriasis. Now goat's milk and kefir could do wonders for him. He's hoping to get a few days off over the May bank holiday & says he wants some 'grains' to take back with him to try. Most of the ailments associated with the immune sustem and many allergies are actually caused by 'leaky gut' syndrome - where toxins leak out of your gut and into your bloodstream. You pack your gut with probiotics & keep the body's pH balanced with Kombucha and you could see a big fifference.

I know milk & yoghurt is not on some people's radar - they simply don't like it. You're probably one of those Scary, but don't not drink kefir because it "looks" like something it's not! I find it delicious - in fact I'm not a big yoghurt fan normally, but this stuff IS nice. promise!

Tommo can you e-mail me the file of the info. sheet you sent me with the kefir grains please? I want to pinch it to make up an info page to load on the server. Ta.  ThU:-)
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scary crow

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Re: Many thanks King Tommy!
« Reply #8 on: April 16, 2014, 11:37:26 PM »

Just read a bit about leaky gut there saying theres no cure but it,s possible the make it a lot better but there saying you have to watch what you eat and one thing there saying to avoid is milk so would kefir be a good thing to take ...Have a read

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Big Gee

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Re: Many thanks King Tommy!
« Reply #9 on: April 16, 2014, 11:56:07 PM »

Yep read that Scary. There's a big difference between drinking cow's milk & drinking kefir treated milk (dairy or otherwise).

Quote
The Top 5 Healing Foods for Your Digestive Tract

Bone Broth for Healing Leaky Gut
#1 Bone Broth - broth contains collagen and the amino acids proline and glycine that can help heal your damaged cell walls. I’ve  had many of my patients do a bone broth fast for 3 days to help rapidly repair leaky gut.

 cultured dairy to cure leaky gut
#2 Raw Cultured Dairy - contains both probiotics and SCFA’s that can help heal the gut.
Pastured kefir, yogurt, amasai, butter, and raw cheese are some of the best.

fermented vegetables - heal leaky gut
#3 Fermented Vegetables - contain organic acids that balance intestinal pH and probiotics to support the gut.  Sauerkraut, Kimchi, and
Kvass (Kombucha) are excellent sources.

coconut products to heal leaky gut
#4 Coconut Products – all coconut products are especially good for your gut.  The MCFA’s in coconut are easier to digest than other fats so better for leaky gut.  Also, coconut kefir contains probiotics that support your digestive system.

seeds - leaky gut#5 Super seeds – chia seeds, flaxseeds, and hemp seeds are great sources of fiber that can help support the growth of beneficial bacteria.

Also, consuming foods that have anti-inflammatory Omega-3 fats are beneficial such as grass-fed beef, lamb, and wild caught fish like salmon.

Now the good news is, if you don't like dairy products you can use Kefir 'grains' with COCONUT milk!

Check out this link:


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scary crow

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Re: Many thanks King Tommy!
« Reply #10 on: April 17, 2014, 12:18:30 AM »

Interesting read that explained it well horrible thought of undigested food leaking from your gut though ...Is your son going to try as i know he also has skin problems like me would be interested to see how he gets on with it ....
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Westheathdave

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Re: Many thanks King Tommy!
« Reply #11 on: April 17, 2014, 12:28:07 AM »

 RedFaced:-( Very interesting stuff all this G and Scarycat at this rate I think were gonna need a "Medical Page" to or "Healing Page"  HTT:-}
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Big Gee

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Re: Many thanks King Tommy!
« Reply #12 on: April 17, 2014, 12:29:30 AM »

He's definately trying it. As soon as he starts (after the May bank holiday - when I hope he comes to visit with our little grandson Cai) he'll let me know how he gets on. You'll be the first to know my old Scary friend!  Grin2:-)

I've also been hoping to get him some ointment from these people: You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login

They advertise on my Aeron Vale Allotment Society site. As you can see from the link they have a special interest in psoriasis. They also do an absolutely fabulous gardeners honey hand cream, which I use myself - good stuff & the smell is addictive!!

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Poppa Tommo

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Re: Many thanks King Tommy!
« Reply #13 on: April 17, 2014, 07:19:20 AM »

Couple of things, here. Firstly when milk, any milk but for now especially cows milk, is exposed to the kefir culture a large number of chemical changes take place which actually render the 'milk' into a digestible form that even some lactose intolerant people can take...


Here's whath Wikki have to say:

During the fermentation, changes in composition of nutrients and other ingredients occur. Lactose, the sugar present in milk, is broken down mostly to Lactic acid (25%) by the lactic acid bacteria. Propionibacteria further break down some of the lactic into propionic acid (these bacteria also carry out the same fermentation in Swiss Cheese. Other substances that contribute to the flavor of kefir are pyruvic acid,acetic acid, diacetyl and acetoin (both of which contribute a "buttery" flavor),citric acid, acetaldehyde and amino acids resulting from protein breakdown.

The slow-acting yeasts, late in the fermentation process, break lactose down into ethanol and carbon dioxide: depending on the process, ethanol concentration can be as high as 1-2% (achieved by small-scale dairies early in the 20th century), with the kefir having a bubbly appearance and carbonated taste: most modern processes, which use shorter fermentation times, result in much lower ethanol concentrations of 0.2-0.3%.

As a result of the fermentation, very little lactose remains in kefir. People with lactose intolerance are able to tolerate kefir, providing the number of live bacteria present in this beverage consumed is high enough (i.e., fermentation has proceeded for adequate time). It has also been shown that fermented milk products have a slower transit time than milk, which may further improve lactose digestion.

Ok, back to me. So the 'dairy' aspect of leaky gut is not applicable. On a similar note, goats milk has long been recognised as non-dairy as the structure of the milk is different from cows milk.

I have two cultures on the go so my kefir dose is always two to three days old and fully split into what looks like curds and whey. Kefir this age will be slightly higher in alcohol but not more than about 1% or 2%. What you do benefit from with this 'ageing' is a far higher folic acid content.

Now I couldn't drink this stuff this sour so I create my 'supersmoothie' every morning and really you only taste the fruit with a slightly tart edge but which is really creamy. See my super smoothie recipe.

So what of Folic Acid in our diets...

Vitamin B9 (folic acid when converted to folate) is essential for numerous bodily functions. Humans cannot synthesize folate de novo; therefore, folate has to be supplied through the diet to meet their daily requirements. The human body needs folate to synthesize DNA, repair DNA, and methylate DNA as well as to act as a cofactor in certain biological reactions. It is especially important in aiding rapid cell division and growth, such as in infancy and pregnancy. Children and adults both require folate to produce healthy red blood cells and prevent anaemia..

Sorry about such a long post but I do get all enthusiastic about this, hope you didn't nod off, Scaryone

Good enough reason for me to have my daily dose.

KT
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Big Gee

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Re: Many thanks King Tommy!
« Reply #14 on: April 17, 2014, 10:58:11 AM »

Good article that Tomo.

It certainly seems to be doing the trick for me after only a few days of drinking it. It seems to allow muscles to work longer before the lactic acid builds up in them.
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scary crow

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Re: Many thanks King Tommy!
« Reply #15 on: April 17, 2014, 07:14:19 PM »

Well i certaintly dident nod off was a interesting read good to have people on here with so much knowledge on subjects like kefir and kombucha ...
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Re: Many thanks King Tommy!
« Reply #16 on: April 25, 2014, 10:29:14 PM »

Well from what i have read on here i thought that to produce Kefir you had to buy or obtain from another producer kefir ''grains'' to be able to make kefir ...But today when mrs crow was looking through a old book we have here from the 1920,s for cake recipes i had a quick look for kefir and came across this .  KEPHIR discovered today theres several different ways to spell this ,.It says this is a form of fermented milk like KOUMISS to make fermented milk put boiled cows milk into strong pint bottles leaving a small part empty ,add a quarter ounce of white sugar and a small piece of yeast about the size of 2 peas to each bottle ..Cork wire and place the bottles on their sides ..Shake them every morning and evening .  The milk will be ready in a week ...No mention of ''grains'' can someone explain why this does not mention the use of grains  ? .
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scary crow

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Re: Many thanks King Tommy!
« Reply #17 on: April 25, 2014, 10:34:30 PM »

Something similar to kefir ...

How To Make Koumiss

Koumiss (spelt also kumyss) is a fermented liquor made originally by the Tartars from mares' milk; a somewhat similar liquor, called lebau or yaourt, is made from cows' milk by the Arabians and Turks; it is also prepared by the Russians under the name of kef. To prepare it, the milk is diluted with a little water, then placed in bags made of hides, and shaken till the cream is thrown up; it is then placed in earthen vessels and kept in a warm place until fermentation takes place. To hasten this, a little koumiss is added from a previous fermentation. The liquid is frequently well stirred to incorporate the curd and fat, and must be shaken before being drunk. The process is a true fermentation, the milk sugar being destroyed by a peculiar ferment with the production of lactic acid, alcohol, and carbonic acid. The liquid is said to have an agreeable sourish taste, and is sometimes recommended, though it is rarely seen, in England. One of the few means of getting the ferment in this country is to shake the milk in a bladder or to add some rennet. According to the American Druggist, koumiss commonly is made in America by adding yeast to cows' milk and then fermenting.

The best results are, however, obtained from the use of mares' milk, this being the basic ingredient of the original Russian koumiss. Mares' milk is less rich in casein and fatty matter than cows' milk, and is therefore more easy of digestion. In the United States of America cows' milk is used always, and generally it answers the purpose well, but it is better to dilute the milk with water to reduce the percentage of casein, etc. Mares" milk contains 8.75 per cent, of milk sugar, cows' milk only 5'35; therefore it is necessary to add sugar to the preparation when made from cows' milk. The following-recipe has been found to answer well. Dissolve 3oz. of milk sugar in 32 oz. of water, and add the solution to 95 oz. of milk; rub together 1/3 oz. of compressed yeast and 2 1/2 oz. of brown sugar in a mortar with a little of the mixture, and then strain into the other portion. Strong bottles are essential, champagne bottles being frequently used, and the corks should fit very tightly and be wired down; if the cork does not fit properly, the carbonic acid gas as formed will escape and leave a worthless preparation.

The koumiss must be kept at a moderate temperature, and to ensure it being properly finished the bottles containing it should be gently shaken each day for about ten minutes to prevent the clotting of the casein. It is well to take the precaution of rolling a cloth round the bottle during the shaking process, as the amount of gas generated is great, and should the bottle be of thin glass or contain a flaw it may burst. Some few days elapse before the fermentation passes into the acid stage, and when this has taken place the preparation is much thicker. It is then in the proper condition for allaying sickness, being retained by the stomach when almost everything else is rejected. A fairly good quantity of koumiss may be prepared in a small way in the following manner. Fill a quart champagne bottle to the neck with pure cows' milk, add two tablespoonfuls of white sugar dissolved in a little warm water, and a very small quantity of compressed yeast. Then securely fasten the cork in the bottle and shake the mixture well; place it in a room having a temperature of from 70° to 80° F. for six hours, and finally in an ice box for about twelve hours, and it then should be ready for use.

 


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scary crow

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Re: Many thanks King Tommy!
« Reply #18 on: April 25, 2014, 10:45:08 PM »

Me again this is another bit of reading material this sounds like kefir but with water rather than milk may be of interest ..




Tibicos

Fermented water kefir with grains on the bottom and a floating piece of grapefruit peel
Tibicos grains average 5 mm in size.

Tibicos are a culture of bacteria and yeasts held in a polysaccharide biofilm matrix created by the bacteria. As with kefir grains, the microbes present in tibicos act in symbiosis to maintain a stable culture. Tibicos can do this in many different sugary liquids, feeding off the sugar to produce lactic acid, alcohol (ethanol), and carbon dioxide gas, which carbonates the drink.

Tibicos is also known as tibi, water kefir grains, sugar kefir grains, Japanese water crystals and California bees, and in older literature as bébées, African bees, ale nuts, Australian bees, balm of Gilead, beer seeds, beer plant, bees, ginger bees, Japanese beer seeds and vinegar bees,[1]

Tibicos are found around the world, with no two cultures being exactly the same. Typical tibicos have a mix of Lactobacillus, Streptococcus, Pediococcus and Leuconostoc bacteria with yeasts from Saccharomyces, Candida, Kloeckera and possibly others. Lactobacillus brevis has been identified as the species responsible for the production of the polysaccharide (dextran) that forms the grains.[2][3] Pidoux (1989)[3] also identifies the sugary kefir grain with the ginger beer plant. Certainly opportunistic bacteria take advantage of this stable symbiotic relation which might be the reason for the many different names/distinction in the scientific literature. Different ingredients or hygienic conditions might also change the fungal and bacteriological composition, leading to the different names. People who do not wish to consume dairy products may find that water kefir provides probiotics without the need for dairy or tea cultured products, such as kombucha. The finished product, if bottled, will produce a carbonated beverage. It will continue to ferment when bottled thus producing more carbonation—so bottles need to be capped loosely and allowed to breathe, or they may become explosive.



Origin

At least two references in the scientific literature relate to the origin of the tibi. According to the first paper, tibicos forms on the pads of the Opuntia cactus (from Mexico) as hard granules that can be reconstituted in a sugar-water solution as propagating tibicos.


The basic preparation method is to add tibicos to a sugary liquid and allow it to ferment 24 to 48 hours. A typical recipe might contain the tibicos culture, a citrus fruit and water. It is important to use ingredients that will not inhibit the fermentation, such as chlorine in tap water or preservatives in dried fruit (sulfites). The fruits used may be changed and mixed to create different flavors.

Additional precautions should be taken to keep the cultures healthy. The use of reactive metals such as aluminium, copper, or zinc should be minimized, since the acidity of the solution can draw these metals out, damaging the culture. The beverage should not be stored in metal containers, as these may leach into it over time. Instead, use stainless steel, plastic, non-lead-glazed ceramic or glass containers. Culturing grains in a glass jar and using clean stainless steel or plastic utensils when handling the grains is recommended.

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Big Gee

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Re: Many thanks King Tommy!
« Reply #19 on: April 26, 2014, 01:58:38 AM »

That's very interesting Scary. I'm sure that Kefir, Kombucha & Tibicos are basically the same mechanisms but different in their own ways. At this rate I won't be eating any food just brewing & drinking all these beverages!

This Tibicos sounds like a possible alternative for you - seeing as you're not keen on dairy substances. Do you fancy giving it a go?
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