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Author Topic: None Chemical Insect Spray  (Read 150 times)

squirrel

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None Chemical Insect Spray
« on: January 05, 2014, 09:45:22 AM »

Insect repellent using EMs
1. What is meant by Effective Microorganisms (EM)?
E.M. is an abbreviation for Effective Microorganisms
Microorganisms are tiny units of life that are too small to be seen with the naked eye and they exist everywhere in nature. Microorganisms are crucial for maintaining the ecological balance. They carry out chemical processes that make it possible for all other organisms including humans to live. There are friendly guys of the microbial worlds known as beneficial microorganisms and a not so friendly group called pathogens that are
harmful and capable of producing disease, decay and pollution.
EM origin
In 1982 Dr.Higa at the University of Ryukyus, Okinawa Japan, discovered a specific group of naturally occurring beneficial microorganisms with an amazing ability to revive, restore, and preserve. He named this group E.M. (Effective microorganisms).
Using EM to make an Insect Repellent
This mix will make a non-toxic chemical free insect repellent. It can be used to prevent pest and disease problems in the garden. It acts by creating a barrier around the plant thereby protecting it from insects. The mix can be enhanced by including garlic, hot peppers or aloe vera . These are chopped or mashed prior to adding to the mix.
Mixing
Warm water (chlorine free )    :   300 ml
Molasses   :   50 ml
Natural vinegar   :   50 ml
Whiskey or ethyl alcohol   :   50 ml
EM liquid concentrate   :   50 ml
Select a suitable sized container for mixing, some plastic bottles with caps for storage and a funnel. Add the molasses to the warm water and stir till thoroughly mixed. Then add the vinegar, whiskey and EM concentrate. Pour the mix into the plastic bottles and add small quantities of chopped garlic etc. Seal as tightly as possible and leave in a warm dark place. Release any gas produced at least twice daily by releasing the cap. The EM is ready for use when the production of gas has stopped and the product has a sweet fruity smell. The mix can be stored in a dark cool place which has a uniform temperature for up to 3 months. If garlic extract has been used, filter this out before storage. Do not store in the refrigerator.
Using EM insect repellent mix
Dilute 20 mls of the mix in 2 litres of clean water in a sprayer and spray enough of the mix to wet the crop. Spraying can begin from seed germination or plant establishment and before pests and diseases can be seen. If an attack occurs use up to 30 mls of solution in 2 litres of water Spray weekly either in the morning or after heavy rains for best results.
EM the natural product
   EM is the trade mark used to identify this particular mixture of beneficial organisms
   E.M. is a combined culture of aerobic microorganisms (requiring oxygen to survive) and anaerobic (requires no oxygen to survive) that co-exist together to the mutual advantage of both (symbiosis).
   E.M combines with the existing microorganisms within the soil. They work together to build a healthy living soil.
   E.M is not toxic or pathogenic and is safe for humans, animals and the environment

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Westheathdave

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Re: None Chemical Insect Spray
« Reply #1 on: January 05, 2014, 10:52:36 AM »

 ThU432:-) That sounds great stuff squrrel How much does it cost and where do you get it from.
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Re: None Chemical Insect Spray
« Reply #2 on: January 05, 2014, 11:20:02 AM »

Another brilliant post from you on EMs Squirrel!

I'm still ploughing through your other post on EMs with the videos (You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login)

I'm finding all this fascinating. It's also closely tied in with Kombucha brewing and Bokashi. I'm finding a whole new world to explore thanks to you Squirrel! Dave (Westheathdave) & I have been brewing Kombucha for years and like most all others who have tried it we are both thoroughly convinced of it's health bemefits. I'm not sure about Dave (I haven't spoken to him about it yet), but I'm waking up to the realisation that I've been using EMs in the form of Kombucha without even realising that it's all part and parcel of the same thing! Quite strangely, most of the literature on Kombucha never seems to mention EMs - that's like dabbling with electricity without realising it's just a part of the wider subject of physics!

Bokashi is the next target area for me. All of this information is so poorly distributed and intellectually 'marketed' don't you think? talk about hiding lights under bushels! There's a whole new exciting world of discovery here that's been quietly hiding under our noses!
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squirrel

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Re: None Chemical Insect Spray
« Reply #3 on: January 05, 2014, 11:40:35 AM »

The basic concentrate costs around 8 or 9 pound for 250ml or around 22 to 35 for a litre.
This makes 10x volume once activated and it is this activated stuff you then dilute again for use.

The dilutions are between 10 and more than 50 to 1 depending on what you are suing it for so the original litre of concentrate will end up making at least 100 litres of highly effective solution.

Although the literature says not to keep for too long I knew it could be kept as the farmers in poor countries make it themselves and keep it going. I keep my activated 10litre solution in a large demijohn with an air lock, feed it black treacle and it has now served me for more that 3 years. Each time I remove a few litres to use I top up with hot water (unchlorinated) and black treacle and by the time I have finished what I took which is usually a week or two later it is ready to take more of it for further use.

It does not seem to be made in the UK at all. In fact Europe seems to have been a bit slow off the mark, and there are not many distributors. It is one of those things that they seem to want to keep the price high

Main distributor here in the UK is

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If you really want to try it I am happy to send you some for just the cost of postage.

 
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squirrel

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Re: None Chemical Insect Spray
« Reply #4 on: January 05, 2014, 11:50:37 AM »

You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
Another brilliant post from you on EMs Squirrel!

I'm still ploughing through your other post on EMs with the videos (You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login)

I'm finding all this fascinating. It's also closely tied in with Kombucha brewing and Bokashi. I'm finding a whole new world to explore thanks to you Squirrel! Dave (Westheathdave) & I have been brewing Kombucha for years and like most all others who have tried it we are both thoroughly convinced of it's health bemefits. I'm not sure about Dave (I haven't spoken to him about it yet), but I'm waking up to the realisation that I've been using EMs in the form of Kombucha without even realising that it's all part and parcel of the same thing! Quite strangely, most of the literature on Kombucha never seems to mention EMs - that's like dabbling with electricity without realising it's just a part of the wider subject of physics!

Bokashi is the next target area for me. All of this information is so poorly distributed and intellectually 'marketed' don't you think? talk about hiding lights under bushels! There's a whole new exciting world of discovery here that's been quietly hiding under our noses!


I am now really interested in discovering the difference between Kombucha and EMs. There must be a difference as Komucha needs open fermentation with oxygen whilst EMs needs the oxygen to be excluded.

I use the bokashi method in the kitchen and even cooked food go in, including bones and many of the taboo stuff for composting. I never get a problem with smells or flies with it and I am starting to pull together an article about it all.

The big boys have caught onto both EMs and Bokashi and it is rather expensive, but myself and others on my last forum felt that it should be much more accessible than this and easy to keep fermenting the EMs and make our own bokashi bran.

I find the bran making time consuming so buy. But I keep a 23litre bottle of EMs fermenting in my kitchen and take from it just like you do the Kombucha. Top it up and feed it ready for the next time.

I am so gald it is catching your attention Big Gee
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Big Gee

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Re: None Chemical Insect Spray
« Reply #5 on: January 05, 2014, 12:45:43 PM »

I'm glad it's catching my attention as well, I'm just flabberghasted with myself for missing it in the past. Mind you there are so many 'wonderous' things with 'amazing' results put in front of us that we can sometimes throw the occasional baby out with the bath water!

The use of "good" bacteria and yeasts in Kombucha brewing is exactly the same symbiotic relationship. The only main difference as far as I can see at this early stage of my interest is that Kombucha uses aerobic bacteria, whilst EMs use anaerobic bacteria, but the resultant process of producing colonies of good bacteria seems to be the same.

Surely the same principle applies to compost. If you encourage aerobic bacteria the biological content is broken down and heat is produced. The end product is compost. If you encourage anaeroic bacteria by cutting down the available oxygen & thereby lower the heat then the contents will still be broken down (albeit a bit smellier and a longer process), at the end of it you get exactly the same compost.

I believe it's the same with the Kombucha process - when compared to the "brewing" of EMs. One arrives at the conclusion of it's process using aerobic bacteria, the other arrives using anaerobic bacteria, but the resultant content is the same - a broth of good (or popularly tagged "pro-botic") fluid that is used to our benefit.

Kombucha goes to work on our bodies the EMs go to work on our polluted environment or they produce material that's beneficiaql for our soil - which is what Bokashi is used for to break down kitchen waste.

All part and parcel of the same large & diverse family I would say.
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Westheathdave

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Re: None Chemical Insect Spray
« Reply #6 on: January 19, 2014, 04:00:34 PM »

 what:-o This is all fascinating stuff Squirrel and G and it looks to me like G is putting it all together so it makes sense. Basicly we have got kombucha for the good of the ground without oxygen to make it.
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squirrel

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Re: None Chemical Insect Spray
« Reply #7 on: January 20, 2014, 10:04:03 PM »

Quote
BG said "Surely the same principle applies to compost. If you encourage aerobic bacteria the biological content is broken down and heat is produced. The end product is compost. If you encourage anaerobic bacteria by cutting down the available oxygen & thereby lower the heat then the contents will still be broken down (albeit a bit smellier and a longer process), at the end of it you get exactly the same compost"

Almost but not quite BG. With EMs, especially in the Bokashi form, the organic stuff does not break down, it pickles. even  after a month in a closed bucket it looks pretty much as you put it in, but with the EM impregnated bran or sawdust it smells sweet rather like the malting's from brewing, and I now also find a little like Kombucha. It is when it is buried in the soil that it starts to break down and does so faster than usual. With EM based Bokashi there is no putrefaction, there is fermentation.

I just took two buckets of EMs to the allotment last Tuesday. My buckets have taps and I drained the precious juice off before taking them as it will provide a plant food when diluted with water. The first of these buckets has sat next to the radiator in my kitchen for 3 weeks whilst I filled the other one. Amongst the vegetation there was fish skins, cooked food, meat bones and even the remains of a cheese sauce. It had been kept airtight and unopened for 3 weeks. The other for one week after filling.

My gardener could not believe how pleasant the smell was when we opened the buckets and tossed them into the bean trench before back filling. 
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