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Author Topic: oxtail cooking  (Read 168 times)

lottieguy

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oxtail cooking
« on: November 06, 2017, 09:12:04 AM »

Hi Ya, I know this is in the wrong place but I cannot find recipes. I adore oxtail soup and wondered if any one had/ has a recipe for it or any recipe that uses oxtail in a stew or such like. I would be delioghted if some one has a proven easy to cook recipe for slow cooker. Happy Eating
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spuds

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Re: oxtail cooking
« Reply #1 on: November 06, 2017, 11:05:51 AM »

take a look at these
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Spuds (mick Ford)
is that the kettle I hear boiling
Newton Abbot Sunny Devon ( most times!)

aftermidnight

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Re: oxtail cooking
« Reply #2 on: November 06, 2017, 04:14:29 PM »

YUM, love oxtail soups and stews, so rich and flavorful.

Annette
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scary crow

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Re: oxtail cooking
« Reply #3 on: November 06, 2017, 10:54:16 PM »

Buy ten tails as all those recipes sound and look scrummy  ThU:-)
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ThU:-)LOOK CLICK BELOW TO VIEW DRAWINGS  ThU:-)

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lottieguy

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Re: oxtail cooking
« Reply #4 on: November 07, 2017, 08:52:27 AM »

Hi Ya, Thank you Spuds. spoilt for choice now it is I am. Have you tried any? will give one a go and report back to you when eaten. Thanks again
« Last Edit: November 08, 2017, 09:01:07 AM by lottieguy »
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spuds

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Re: oxtail cooking
« Reply #5 on: November 07, 2017, 01:38:57 PM »

 sorry, no I have not tried  any of them
nearest I get ox tail is a can of soup   
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Spuds (mick Ford)
is that the kettle I hear boiling
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Poppa Tommo

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Re: oxtail cooking
« Reply #6 on: November 08, 2017, 12:05:22 AM »

I love oxtail stew, so full of flavour and goodness. I love it with a big dollop of mashed potato and a good heap of garden peas; couple that with a slab of well buttered home made bread and you have something resembling heaven on a plate. It's no wonder I find it hard to keep my weight down!


Have you noticed, though, just how expensive this previously cheap meat has become? I asked our local butcher last year why and he said that oxtail is hugely popular with our migrant workers who snap it up as soon as its in the window....ah well....laws of supply and demand again. How long before our meddling scientists GM us a three tailed cow or a six legged chicken!!!
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aftermidnight

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Re: oxtail cooking
« Reply #7 on: November 08, 2017, 02:00:26 AM »

.... and ribs, When I was very young  the butcher used to give them away free and now they cost an arm and a leg.

Annette
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lottieguy

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Re: oxtail cooking
« Reply #8 on: November 08, 2017, 09:04:53 AM »

Hi Ya, It was soup I had in mind making as I am used to tins and thought I can make that, I didn't realise there was so much else you can do with it, I am with you PT and putting on weight just thinking about stew and mash, mmmmm, I have noticed the prices rising as we used to eat brisket as it was a cheap otion and slowcookered was lovely, it is same price now as other cuts. I am looking forward to cooking it now even more, thanks all
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Poppa Tommo

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Re: oxtail cooking
« Reply #9 on: November 08, 2017, 09:05:38 AM »

I know, that and other food prices which, apart from simply enjoying the process of having a personal relationship with our own food production, is why we worked to achieve our long held dream of a Smallholding.


After we'd been here a couple of years we began to notice that certain people/acquaintances would book in a weekend holiday with us. Out would come the home reared legs of lamb, belly pork, organic chickens, bacon etc etc which they would consume enthusiastically; even my home brewed wines, ciders and beers would be guzzled with equal relish without any reciprocal 'chipping in'.


Of course any and all our friends are welcome to share our bounty. But we began to notice. I suppose we had dropped into habit of not keeping up to date with the 'real' cost of meats out there until Ruth spotted the price of a leg of lamb in our local Morrison's; but as she said, that real cost to us is in the hard work and long hours we put in - we benefit by keeping our costs down as a result.


We don't like the idea that some of our 'friends' are freeloaders but once you spot it it is hard to let it go.


A strategy for enlightenment was thusly needed. So. In following visits when compliments  over Ruth's latest culinary achievements were being consumed, we would say....'do you know that so and so are taking us for granted, never offering even a bottle of wine etc. Really, I don't believe it.....without naming THEM or the others you could see the penny begin to drop. Following visits seemed to have improved miraculously.


As I said, we like our friends, and like to see them but we don't like to taken for granted and at least that doesn't happen very often these days.
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lottieguy

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Re: oxtail cooking
« Reply #10 on: November 08, 2017, 09:10:29 AM »

Hi Ya, I agree with you PT you can,t beat home grown. I would love to gat a smallholding but my OH is not up for it. One programme that I remember from years ago and is being reshown now is the good life and I still enjoy it and watch it again now. What is your recipe for oxtail stew then PT? Be interesting to try. Happy eating
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Poppa Tommo

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Re: oxtail cooking
« Reply #11 on: November 09, 2017, 07:56:57 AM »


Ok here it is. But, I must point out that this by no means definitive. The lovely Princess Starryshapes once told me as I was struggling to get the ingredients together for an Italian salad I was making for Ruth  "......there aren't any rules in cookin, dad. If you haven't got all the ingredients for a recipe, just put in the things you like the taste of"

Thusly pleas add the stuff you like and take out the stuff you don't. Sometimes I like to put peas in but Ruth isn't keen.

The secret, for us, is in the long, long, slow cooked method. We use a large slowcooker for up to 8 hours ( 6 is ok too if you can't wait) just make sure that it doesn't reduce too much by adding a little red wine or water if necessary.

This will feed loads but as it freezes well it's worth doing a big batch for two.

WARNING - this recipe may be addictive.




INGREDIENTS

1kg oxtail pieces


  • 2 tablespoons plain flour


  • 2 tablespoons olive oil


  • 8 rashers middle cut bacon, chopped - the French do packets of lardons which are handy.


  • 1 large onion, coarsely chopped


  • 2 sticks celery, coarsely chopped


    Some rough diced parsnip


  • 4 medium carrots, coarsely chopped


  • 150g button mushrooms, halved


  • 1/2 cup (125ml) red wine


  • 1 1/2 cups (375ml) beef stock


    2 or 3 tablespoons of my extra rich tomato and garlic paste ( the recipe for this is in the recipe section on here)


  • 1 bay leaf


  • 2 sprigs fresh thyme


  • 2 tablespoons coarsely chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley






[/size]METHOD
Step 1
Season oxtail. Coat pieces in flour, shaking off excess.
[/size][/color]

  • Step 2
    Heat oil in a large frypan over medium-high heat. Cook oxtail for 2 minutes each side or until browned. Transfer to the bowl of a 5 litre slow-cooker. Add bacon to a separate frypan and cook, stirring, for 3 minutes or until well browned, even slightly crispy browned. Add to oxtail. ( this works really well as an addition to a bolognaise too)

  • Step 3
    Add vegetables, wine, stock, bay leaf, thyme and tomato paste to slow-cooker. Cover with lid. Turn slow-cooker on low. Cook for 8 hours or until oxtail is tender. Stir in parsley just before serving.


    Now if that doesn't get your mouth watering nothing will. 😜😜😜😜
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lottieguy

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Re: oxtail cooking
« Reply #12 on: November 09, 2017, 09:42:21 AM »

Hi Ya, Sounds scrummy PT, I will give it a go as I would rather try a used recipe initially. Thanks for your advice about ingredients as I am not keen on celery. I did try it but it to sharp for my taste but having read up it seems if it is treated wrongly it goes bitter. Seeing it used in quite a few recipe's has made me consider having a try at growing it myself. I made note of Princess Starryshapes advice aswell. I tend to go for ingredients I like but will try a few others now. Thanks both. The recipe is copied printed and it will be on the go saturday. Will let you know how I get on. Thanks
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lottieguy

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Re: oxtail cooking
« Reply #13 on: November 09, 2017, 11:45:37 AM »

Hi Ya, followed your advice and had a look at the VITAMIX, wowee, at that price I think it should chop logs never mind tomato skins. I will suffer and try my one. Can you follow the recipe with the skins removed I wonder? I will give it a go. Thanks any way
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lottieguy

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Re: oxtail cooking
« Reply #14 on: December 02, 2017, 02:06:44 PM »

Hi Ya, well trid the recipe and three meals out it. My OH wasn't to keen all the more for me. The last of I minced up foy Monday lunch. Followed your recipe PT and like SS said added what I thought. Don't quite get the idea of why you cover in flour before frying? Still with some home grown mashed spud it was ansome. Happy eating
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Poppa Tommo

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Re: oxtail cooking
« Reply #15 on: December 04, 2017, 07:18:48 AM »

Really pleased you enjoyed it Lottieguy. as for 'flouring the meat' I suppose it's an old habit that I picked up from my mother. It's all down to the individual really - she always said that it draws some of the flavours into the flour, caramelises better and then becomes a flavoursome thickener for the stew sauce.


She also says that at the start of making a rue ( which is basically what we're doing with the flooring ) it's always best to hot melt butter or whatever fat is being used, in a pan and gradually add flour which then frizzles and opens the flour. Then slowly add the stock whilst stirring/whisking to make a wonderfully smooth, lump free sauce. It really does work. I always do it this way when I make a fish-stock sauce to add to my fish pies.
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