Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Username: Password:
Pages: [1]   Go Down

Author Topic: Little moths, another problem  (Read 331 times)

lottieguy

  • Senior Multi Plot Cultivator
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 640
  • Location: Suffolk/Norfolk Border
  • Happy Gardening to All Where ever you are
Little moths, another problem
« on: June 17, 2016, 02:47:15 PM »

Hi Ya, I am hearing about a new thug on the plot that attacks brassicas. Called the Diamond Back Moth it has been importde from abroad and is so small by all accounts it can get though debris netting. Have posted a picture I got from else where.
Logged

Big Gee

  • Global Moderator
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Gender: Male
  • Posts: 7524
  • Location: Aberaeron, Wales
  • Gardening knowledge unshared is wasted
    • Aeron Vale Allotment Trust
Re: Little moths, another problem
« Reply #1 on: June 17, 2016, 06:46:20 PM »

Yes I had heard about it. Not imported though, they are very capable of flying across the channel without any help.

Whether they'll cause the damage indicated by the hype is another matter. It's getting near the 'silly season' for news items, so they resort to some story about some cataclysmic insect ridden threat every year. If it's not some giant something or other, then it's cannibal slugs from Spain, or flat worms from New Zealand or some other horror story. They probably will arrive, but I doubt if they'll eat every brassica in sight on the south of England coast! And as usual there's no defence  what:-o

It's at these times I'm glad I live on the west Wales coast with mountains at our backs!  lol(1)
Logged
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login  You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login

Poppa Tommo

  • Senior Multi Plot Cultivator
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Gender: Male
  • Posts: 2030
  • Location: Sunny Devon
  • Username: Robw349
  • 'Gardener' the definition of 'Optimist'
Re: Little moths, another problem
« Reply #2 on: June 18, 2016, 09:56:34 AM »

They actually have been in the uk for a while. Every time we get strong winds coming up fro the continent a few million more ride the air waves and settle I here.

They love brassicas. I don't know about debris netting but enviro mesh is impervious to ALL flying insects that may damage our crops. Diamond backs are about half an inch long (roughly 13mm). Carrot root fly is miles smaller than the diamond back and doesn't get through...under, yes if you don't tuck it into the earth and small tears and holes are an easy entry point.

Here are a few links to keep you busy whilst the rain keeps us indoors.

You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login

You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login

There is a place up in Scotland that re-cycles enviro mesh on an industrial scale, sometimes in 100metre lengths - gave some to Gee  and Spuds. My mate Steve has the contact details so when I wonder up to see him I'll get the details and post them on here. This second hand stuff can come in as low as only 20p a metre so is worth grabbing and sharing out between allotment holders.

Steve got enough to cover his 40ft by 20ft ploytunnel 10ft high in the middle for around 200quid delivered.

Here's a post from Grow Your Own website in the same vein:


Default Mega Cheap Enviromesh - Aberdeen(shire)/Angus
I've been speaking with a local farm about buying their second hand Wondermesh (Enviromesh) after they lift it off their crops on Sunday.

It measures 13m x 100m and so far too much for us in our Walled Garden/Allotment, but... including VAT it come in at an amazing 20p per square metre. Would anyone be interested in splitting the booty? As an example a 13m x 10m length would cost 26 but you could have as much as you wanted.

I'm based South of Stonehaven near Laurencekirk and my OH works in BOD, Aberdeen so if you are within travelling distance of these places I'm sure we could work something out.

Logged
The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing

Big Gee

  • Global Moderator
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Gender: Male
  • Posts: 7524
  • Location: Aberaeron, Wales
  • Gardening knowledge unshared is wasted
    • Aeron Vale Allotment Trust
Re: Little moths, another problem
« Reply #3 on: June 18, 2016, 11:00:43 AM »

Thanks Tommo - sounds good. It used to be a stinger buying it new - especially Enviromesh, until Veggiemesh appeared on the scene

The Diamond-back moth is not microscopic, as you rightly point out. Properly installed mesh will shield against it, there are many other pests that are much smaller but can't pass through mesh. So no need to panic.

I've also done a bit of reading since lottieguy posted about the moth. It seems that it comes across annually, not mostly over the English Channel - as I assumed, but across the North Sea from it's usual East European breeding grounds. The caterpillars (contrary to what the the doomsday soothsayers say) is actually quite vulnerable and are easily drowned (no fears there then with our usual summertime rain!). I would say the cabbage white butterfly caterpillars are far more robust, and they can also appear in big numbers sometimes, although admittedly it's the number of moths that makes it a bit more of a threat.

As usual the spray happy 'poison mob' are reaching for their potions of death. Typical, they're now looking for a fast fix because this little moth seems to be quite resilient to the usual death sprays on the market. A nice cocktail for the housewives to carry home to their children on their 'greens' from the supermarket, and of course a golden opportunity for the Monsantos & Byers of this world to add a few more shekels to their evil burgeoning coffers.

Here's a snippet of a little  bit of sense that I found  in the midst of the hype and panic from so-called 'experts' when it comes to spraying poisons :

". . . If the moths are already resistant to the insecticide, it could result in killing friendly insects such as wasps and ladybirds which prey on other pests - which could make their problems with the moths even worse." A bit of sense at last!

I'm not a big fan of direct genetic modification & I'm aopposed to genetic modification in the food chain. But could this be a better option to poisoning and killing everything in sight?

<object width="640" height="385"> <param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/ImokqcqmSlw&fs=1&start="></param> <param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param> <embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/ImokqcqmSlw&fs=1&start=" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowfullscreen="true" width="640" height="385" wmode="transparent"></embed></object>

Does anyone remember the crap they wrote in 1976 when we were inundated with Ladybirds? I remember reading rubbish like "beware of Ladybirds attacking humans because they can't find enough food!" UNBELIEVABLE but it shows how easily the ignorant public can be spooked through their lack of knowledge of anything that's outside their talent shows and soap opera circles. I despair sometimes.
« Last Edit: June 18, 2016, 12:11:30 PM by Big Gee »
Logged
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login  You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login

Poppa Tommo

  • Senior Multi Plot Cultivator
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Gender: Male
  • Posts: 2030
  • Location: Sunny Devon
  • Username: Robw349
  • 'Gardener' the definition of 'Optimist'
Re: Little moths, another problem
« Reply #4 on: June 18, 2016, 11:21:19 AM »

Perhaps there is a subliminal message in the wording too on the eve of the referendum...unwanted invaders from Europe....they're crossing the channel in droves...we can't keep them out...they're resistant to everything we throw at them......

........heaven forbid, Gee, now that you are suggesting we drown the buggers! what:-{ what:-{ what:-{
Logged
The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing

Big Gee

  • Global Moderator
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Gender: Male
  • Posts: 7524
  • Location: Aberaeron, Wales
  • Gardening knowledge unshared is wasted
    • Aeron Vale Allotment Trust
Re: Little moths, another problem
« Reply #5 on: June 18, 2016, 11:26:40 AM »

You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
Perhaps there is a subliminal message in the wording too on the eve of the referendum...unwanted invaders from Europe....they're crossing the channel in droves...we can't keep them out...they're resistant to everything we throw at them......

........heaven forbid, Gee, now that you are suggesting we drown the buggers! what:-{ what:-{ what:-{

 cwl:-]

All I'm saying is they drown easily! I've just edited my last post with the inclusion of a video - what are your views on that train of development?
Logged
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login  You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login

Westheathdave

  • Global Moderator
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Gender: Male
  • Posts: 1823
  • Location: Birmingham
Re: Little moths, another problem
« Reply #6 on: June 18, 2016, 11:46:40 PM »

Interesting video that Gee. Much better than killing everything that flies, much better idea. 10/10   ThU5:-)
Logged

Poppa Tommo

  • Senior Multi Plot Cultivator
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Gender: Male
  • Posts: 2030
  • Location: Sunny Devon
  • Username: Robw349
  • 'Gardener' the definition of 'Optimist'
Re: Little moths, another problem
« Reply #7 on: June 19, 2016, 05:02:17 PM »

An excellent video, Gee. Seems very well thought through solution, especially as the GM dies with males in the field with, hopefully no further environmental implications. Of course, we don't know how far reaching these modifications are but I was reassured that diamond back moth populations can be left naturally to build up if anything seems to go wrong.

When we get concentrations of pestilence like these we only have ourselves to blame. WE invented monoculture (something not found in nature) so we, thereby, invented thousand acre banquet tables for pest populations to explode.

One of the key messages behind all this is one that can't be forgotten is PESTICIDES are only another sticking plaster solution. As Geoff Goldblum's character says in Jurassic Park....."......nature will always find a way". In this case as in our pesticide development, the organism slowly finds a way round it. From the deadly varroa to this diamond back, immunity has evolved, poisons have to become stronger, the organism evolves around this and so on.

Paradoxically it seems that we, humans, seem to be the last in this race as we poison ourselves through the shite we spray all over the food we eat.

Don't despair too much, Gee, charity begins at home. At least your, and our, shared enlightenment guarantees at least our tiny corners of this wonderful earth are being nurtured properly. It is through this stewardship that others might be educated and learn too. Two of my children Carry this torch now. That is two, out of one. Imagine how this might replicate itself.
Logged
The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing
Pages: [1]   Go Up