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Author Topic: weed identity  (Read 178 times)

lottieguy

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weed identity
« on: July 17, 2017, 06:27:53 AM »

Hi Ya, I hope this works as there is a new way of pasting pictures. I was wondering if anyone can identify this plant. It is growing rife on my plot and is very flat to the ground and would make a great ground cover. I think it has been brought in and flower as some on site use the plot as a garden. I have recently been invaded by oxalis red and white brought in by some one to their plot. I don't mind but the one next door has planted a wild garden with different poppies, burdock etc, They are taking over a real pain in the backside. There are others aswell which I will ask if I can't identify myself. Happy Gardening
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Big Gee

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Re: weed identity
« Reply #1 on: July 17, 2017, 11:48:18 AM »

It looks like Corn Chamomile to me Lottieguy. Strictly speaking not a weed, but a 'wild flower'. It's a prolific little fellow that can be a nuisance, as it self seeds everywhere. As you say that someone is using a plot to sow wild flowers then it's a fair bet that's where it originated.

Why do silly people not use allotment plots for the purpose they were created for? Hasn't anyone told them that plots are for growing food? I love wild flower meadows, especially for their benefit to bees and other pollinating insects - but on an allotment plot? NO, No, no, no.
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lottieguy

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Re: weed identity
« Reply #2 on: July 17, 2017, 02:47:00 PM »

Hi Ya. I agree with you BG, they told me about wild flower garden so I did not protest. Silly boy. I think each to their own but this is bad, the flowers have actually out grown the raspberry I have growing there. I see each to their own and some live in flats with no garden so a place to get out is welcome and others are retired so the plot becomes a focal point of their lives. But I was always told to be mind full of your neighbours. There is another one that has turned up and is very prolific as well I may take a picture and test you on that as well. Happy Gardening
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Big Gee

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Re: weed identity
« Reply #3 on: July 17, 2017, 04:31:56 PM »

Sure, send a pic and I'll do my best.

Allotment plots are not meant to be used as wild flower gardens, for very good reasons. There's a place for everything. Sow a whole meadow with wild flower seeds - great. Or encourage them in the hedgerows, fantastic. On an allotment plot, then you're asking for problems.  Many wild flowers are classified as weeds, for a very good reason. There's nothing wrong with weeds, they're just vigorous plants growing where you don't want them. You CERTAINLY don't want to encourage them on an allotment site.

Sadly the old saying is so true "a little knowledge is dangerous". It's obvious that your plot neighbour who's growing wild flowers (weeds) has a lot to learn!
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lottieguy

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Re: weed identity
« Reply #4 on: July 18, 2017, 08:41:24 AM »

Hi Ya, I'm with you on that one BG. The person tends to listen to an idiot who talks out of his backside. I told them of an offer on water butts buy one get one free, they went and ordered one then said I should of listened to you but partner said only need one, it was free, you could sell it on half price and still be ahead. Oh well. I think it is corn chamomile I pulled a piece yesterday and it is very aromatic. Nice but a pain in the backside. I have never seen these weeds before and wondered why they have appeared all of sudden this year, they grow like like wild fire if only the gene in them was in the crops. I spoke to a new neighbour as well yesterday who said they wanted to grow flowers I said I hoped not wild ones but they assured me it was lily's and sweet Williams etc. So ok. Happy gardening
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Big Gee

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Re: weed identity
« Reply #5 on: July 18, 2017, 09:21:15 AM »

Dahlias & sweet peas have always been the traditional flowers grown on allotments to compliment the veg. Dahlias to take home to the other half as cut flowers for the house, and the sweet peas to add colour and a bit of scent to make the environment more pleasing for the grower.

There's a reason for that. Neither plant causes any problems. The old stagers would have hung you up to dry if you grew wild flowers next to their beloved vegetable plot! Lilies are OK but even sweet William is a biennial and can self seed given the right conditions.
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