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Author Topic: What you need to know about FERTILIZERS  (Read 240 times)

Big Gee

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What you need to know about FERTILIZERS
« on: January 30, 2014, 01:13:18 AM »

Download this PDF file to find comprehensive information on fertilizer & lime use. Also soil pH facts. Feel free to comment here after you've read it!

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galina

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Re: What you need to know about FERTILIZERS
« Reply #1 on: January 30, 2014, 09:39:17 AM »

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Download this PDF file to find comprehensive information on fertilizer & lime use. Also soil pH facts. Feel free to comment here after you've read it!

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Nice compilation.  Just one comment which came from a lecture at HDRA about organic fertilisers.  As far as overspill into drinking water is concerned, you can overdo organic fertiliser just as well as chemical fertiliser.  For example overdosing with chicken pellets is just as harmful to algae production in drinking water reservoirs because of run off, than overdosing with Growmore.  They even went as far as saying that you can overdose on well rotted manure, although I find it hard to believe that anybody can get their hands on such quantities.  Overdosing is much harder to do with organic fertilisers, which are usually bulkier and more able to keep nutrients in the soil.  But overdosing is still possible and it doesn't do the plants any favours, especially overdosing with nitrogen.

No I have never understood either why there are fewer nutrients available to plants in clay soils.  It is good to know that clay binds these nutrients, so if they are not easily available to plants, at least they don't leach away either.  It just means that liquid fertilising as well as ground preparation is appropriate on clay soils when crops are in full swing.  Comfrey liquid or nettle liquid and not just for tomatoes.

« Last Edit: January 30, 2014, 09:42:55 AM by galina »
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Big Gee

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Re: What you need to know about FERTILIZERS
« Reply #2 on: January 30, 2014, 11:35:09 AM »

Couldn't agree more galina. everything in moderation. And yes just because something is organic does not necessarily mean that you can use it in any way you want.

The classic example is silage effluent that leaches out into rivers from farms. Whole stretches of rivers can be effected - but again it's down to quantities & unnatural uses. Nowhere in nature would that quantity of grass be piled together & that quantity of fluid produced in one go. Silage effluent is the liquid waste produced when a crop is harvested whilst still green for animal fodder and not dried but preserved by excluding air from the storage silo. Because silage effluent is so highly nutritious it is also dangerous as a pollutant if it enters our streams, rivers or lakes. Micro-organisms and algae present in waterways will feed on the effluent causing a reduction in the oxygen content of the water. Fish life literally suffocates from a lack of oxygen in waterways contaminated with silage effluent.

As wth everything, you need to have balance and need to apply common sense. It's daft to believe that organic fertilizers can be used in any quantity in any environment without causing harm. However in the right quantities and with the correct application they are natural and have no bad effects for our soil and our bodies - unlike inorganic synthesized fertilizers that are directly hazardous & have long term effects.
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