Author Topic: Well rotted manure?  (Read 310 times)

Offline Tony

  • Full Plot Cultivator
  • ****
  • Posts: 289
  • I'd rather be gardening
    • Allotment Garden
Well rotted manure?
« on: November 16, 2015, 09:44:22 PM »
Been away for some time but I am now back again.

My question is what does "well rotted" mean.  I have found the term in Abercrombe's book "Every man his own gardener" written in 1787 and various other books right up to present day.  No one really defines it.  Is there a scale of well rottedness with 1 being six months old 2 being a year? 

Just wondering because I dig it in regardless.  It isn't doing any good left in a pile. 

All the best for now.

Offline Big Gee

  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Multi Plot Cultivator
  • *****
  • Posts: 7528
  • Gardening knowledge unshared is wasted
    • Aeron Vale Allotment Trust
Re: Well rotted manure?
« Reply #1 on: November 16, 2015, 10:58:20 PM »
"Well rotted" is rather a loose term. What's really meant is "not too fresh". Fresh manure can be quite acidic and certain manures can burn if used fresh.

Well rotted I would consider manure where the bedding (straw etc.) has broken down and the heap is developing a consistent colour throughout, it becomes more friable and usually turns much darker on it's journey to becoming 'compost'.

Leaving it too long in a heap that's open to the elements is not good either, because the nutrients it contains get leached out by the rain. If left under cover with plenty of air then a year is more than ample to store it. It usually gets used in it's first season. Fresh manure dug into fallow soil in autumn is perfect for soil use the following spring as the weather and organisms in the soil will have broken it down sufficiently.

I hope that helps!

Welcome back by the way!  ThU:-)
 

Offline scary crow

  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Multi Plot Cultivator
  • *****
  • Posts: 3813
Re: Well rotted manure?
« Reply #2 on: November 16, 2015, 11:14:37 PM »
Agree with what gee had to say there about manure   ThU5:-)  he,s our best man when it comes to talking crap  cwl:-]  .     Welcome back Tony all,s the same here well apart from we are all a year older ..

Offline Big Gee

  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Multi Plot Cultivator
  • *****
  • Posts: 7528
  • Gardening knowledge unshared is wasted
    • Aeron Vale Allotment Trust
Re: Well rotted manure?
« Reply #3 on: November 17, 2015, 11:02:06 AM »
Agree with what gee had to say there about manure   ThU5:-)  he,s our best man when it comes to talking crap  cwl:-]  .     Welcome back Tony all,s the same here well apart from we are all a year older ..

Cheeky bloody corvoid!  Angry:-{
 

Offline scary crow

  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Multi Plot Cultivator
  • *****
  • Posts: 3813
Re: Well rotted manure?
« Reply #4 on: November 17, 2015, 04:52:50 PM »
 ROL :-))     lol(1)       cwl:-]     

Offline dimogga

  • Senior Multi Plot Cultivator
  • *****
  • Posts: 504
Re: Well rotted manure?
« Reply #5 on: November 18, 2015, 10:30:15 AM »
On as a mulch it helps worms and the rain washes any nutrients out into the soil (and then away with the excess rain we've had)
I am not in favour of stacking it up in a pile to rot completely as  that means moving it twice - I can't get loads dropped directly on my plot. All that extra work when it can go on in a layer where it's needed.

This last lot of stuff is probably the best we've had ever. He said he didn't have much demand last year - but I think he's forgetting how patient/persistent I was to get a load last year. He was ill and when I rang said to keep ringing until he was better and well enough to deliver. So I did. I imagine most people gave up after the first call and either went without or got it from elsewhere.

Offline scary crow

  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Multi Plot Cultivator
  • *****
  • Posts: 3813
Re: Well rotted manure?
« Reply #6 on: November 30, 2015, 09:36:09 PM »
Marvelous Pigeon Manure

Pigeon manure sells for about twice what other manures sell for. I bet you didn't even know that anyone cared enough to buy or sell Pigeon manure!

Pigeon droppings have a long and honorable history as excellent high-nitrogen fertilizer. They were considered so valuable several hundred years ago, that guards had to be posted on dovecotes, to keep thieves from stealing them!

In addition to their use as fertilizer, they were used for a time as a source of saltpeter for making gunpowder. Gives a whole new meaning to explosive diarrhea, doesn't it?

When composted down, they are unsurpassed for fertilizing high feeder plants, such as tomatoes, watermelon, eggplant, roses, and other plants that like a rich soil.

While they do not burn plants the way chicken manure will do if uncomposted, they do work best if composted. They compost well with a little dirt, and some dried organic matter such as grass clippings or leaves. They can also be composted by themselves, which yields a rich and concentrated fertilizer.

Concentrated Pigeon manure can sell for about $3-5 for a 5 lb bag. Pigeon Manure composted with other organic matter can sell for half that price. Compare that with about $2 for a 30-40 lb bag of bovine manure, or slightly more for chicken manure.

It is also very valuable on your own farm, for keeping your soil in good condition. It makes an excellent manure tea for fertilizing vertical gardens and houseplants, though you'll need to keep it from being too strong.

Pigeon droppings can be tossed into the vermiculture bin also, Worm castings sell for around the same price as Pigeon droppings, sometimes a little more, and this will completely compost the droppings.

They can be scraped up from the floor of a Pigeon house, or if you use deep litter in your Pigeon house, they can be composted with the straw or shavings. In a Flight pen, they will be dry composted over time, and the layer of fresh droppings can be raked to one side, and the top layer of soil shoveled up for use as fertilizer.

In town, Pigeon droppings are considered to be a nuisance, and destructive. But on the farm, they actually have monetary value  Does anybody use pigeon manure I use to when I kept birds and thought it was good .

Offline aftermidnight

  • Senior Multi Plot Cultivator
  • *****
  • Posts: 684
    • Bean, Peas & Other Legumes forum
Re: Well rotted manure?
« Reply #7 on: December 01, 2015, 04:28:38 AM »
Yep been there done that, hubby used to have pigeons. His were racing pigeons, I well remember sitting out on a Saturday morning waiting for the birds to come home from as far as 500 miles away. Getting that band off and punched into the time clock, seconds counted. And yes the manure was fantastic for the garden, best to keep your stash dry tho, if it got wet and it was a warm day it had you gasping for air  RedFaced:-(

Annette

Offline Big Gee

  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Multi Plot Cultivator
  • *****
  • Posts: 7528
  • Gardening knowledge unshared is wasted
    • Aeron Vale Allotment Trust
Re: Well rotted manure?
« Reply #8 on: December 01, 2015, 12:25:49 PM »
Pretty heavy on the amonia fumes when it gets wet isn't it Annette?!

Any pigeon fanciers in your vicinity Scary?
 

Offline scary crow

  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Multi Plot Cultivator
  • *****
  • Posts: 3813
Re: Well rotted manure?
« Reply #9 on: December 01, 2015, 06:58:01 PM »
Maybe the ammonia smell may make the mole move home  lol(1)  .    Have seen a few teams of pigeons flying about the village just need to find where there loft is ....

Offline aftermidnight

  • Senior Multi Plot Cultivator
  • *****
  • Posts: 684
    • Bean, Peas & Other Legumes forum
Re: Well rotted manure?
« Reply #10 on: December 01, 2015, 11:13:29 PM »
We only ran in to THAT smell only once, one night the tarp blew off the bin we were storing it in. It was in the middle of summer, quite hot and unfortunately the same night it blew off it rained buckets, never let that happen again no indeedy. Since the deed had already happened there wasn't much we could do but cover it with a tarp and let it cook. The finished product was lovely tho  CThUpD:-).
Annette

Offline Big Gee

  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Multi Plot Cultivator
  • *****
  • Posts: 7528
  • Gardening knowledge unshared is wasted
    • Aeron Vale Allotment Trust
Re: Well rotted manure?
« Reply #11 on: December 02, 2015, 11:14:55 AM »
There's usually pigeons in most towns & villages, but they're mostly ferrile - so their little packages are distributed far and wide and not contained in a loft. You never know though, if they fly around in flocks then they may be from a loft somewhere. Good luck with that one!
 

Offline dimogga

  • Senior Multi Plot Cultivator
  • *****
  • Posts: 504
Re: Well rotted manure?
« Reply #12 on: December 02, 2015, 11:15:57 AM »
The test for well rotted is "would you pick it up with your bare hand"

Offline Big Gee

  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Multi Plot Cultivator
  • *****
  • Posts: 7528
  • Gardening knowledge unshared is wasted
    • Aeron Vale Allotment Trust
Re: Well rotted manure?
« Reply #13 on: December 02, 2015, 11:29:22 AM »
The test for well rotted is "would you pick it up with your bare hand"

That's a good 'acid' test Di! Mind you there's fresh, well rotted & compost - I would only pick up the third stage with my bare hands!  lol(1)
 

Offline Westheathdave

  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Multi Plot Cultivator
  • *****
  • Posts: 1861
Re: Well rotted manure?
« Reply #14 on: December 02, 2015, 04:13:50 PM »
 :-)snigger Too much muck raking going on here.   cmu:-)