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Author Topic: clay soil  (Read 162 times)

scary crow

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clay soil
« on: October 29, 2015, 10:02:54 PM »

Few facts i found about clay soil ..


Quick facts

Clay soils contain more than 30 percent fine clay particles
Clays swell and shrink as they wet and dry, effectively cultivating themselves
Clay soils take longer to warm up in spring
Wet clay soils are easily damaged when dug or walked on
Drought is much less damaging on clay soils than others soil types
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Westheathdave

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Re: clay soil
« Reply #1 on: October 30, 2015, 09:32:45 AM »

 YRTB  Thanks for that Scary a bit of knowledge about my soil as I am on clay, in fact the whole of the area around where I live is clay and has numerous old clay pits around the area.  clap:-)
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Big Gee

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Re: clay soil
« Reply #2 on: October 30, 2015, 10:29:29 AM »

Clay soils are also fertile, as they don't allow so much leaching of nutrients when it rains. On the down side clay is a pig to work, sticky and heavy when wet and like concrete when it dries - it's also useless for carrots & parsnips!

The only way to improve it's workability is by the application of tons of farmyard manure. Although I live by the sea (where you'd expect a sandy soil) the soil here is clay - but not the nasty grey variety thankfully!
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dimogga

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Re: clay soil
« Reply #3 on: October 30, 2015, 02:26:13 PM »

I have lots of clay on my plot. Which is why I buy muck every year.
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Poppa Tommo

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Re: clay soil
« Reply #4 on: November 11, 2016, 08:55:43 AM »

It's the volcanoes what's done it.


Clay is basically degraded or 'rotten granite' as the French call it.


Granite is volcanic and contains relatively few minerals - silica and feldspar being the two main ones.


As they erode to microscopic particles ( often caused by being ground up by glaciers ) they sort of set as this slippery, well, clay.


Great for Wedgewood, not so great for digging by gardeners.


Our 'Red Devon Clay' is slightly different as when it dries or let's go of the water it becomes crumbly and easy to cultivate. It also has more mineral varieties than standard clays ( is there such a thing?  ). I've learned to live with our 'Red Devon' and tend to keep of it during the wet days. I love the stuff. It is probably the best growing soil I have ever encountered.
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Big Gee

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Re: clay soil
« Reply #5 on: November 11, 2016, 03:31:06 PM »

Terrible stuff to work, but surprisingly fertile. What minerals it does contain, and other nice bits added by us do not leach out, so more is available for plants, and by extension us.

Forget your carrots & parsnips though!
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