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Author Topic: Raspberry, Loganberry and Tayberry Jam  (Read 136 times)

Poppa Tommo

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Raspberry, Loganberry and Tayberry Jam
« on: July 12, 2015, 10:57:38 AM »

the new season fruits are abundantly upon us. I made 20 jars of my own recipe of raspberry, loganberry and Tayberry jam the day before yesterday. Slightly more raspberries than the other two. I was supporting a local church fete by taking plants and produce to sell. Yes I know I'm an atheist but I also believe in community functions too so along I went with my stuff.

I was amazed to find that people who had bought this jam at last year's fete turned up at my pitch as I was setting up in the hope I had brought some this year. Sold the lot in 1 hour.

Actually it is so good, I hesitate to blow my own trumpet because it was serendipity that brought the three fruits together in the first place. Anyway, Ruth said I ought to put the recipe up on the Shed Wall for others to have a go. So, if you have all three fruits on your plot give this one a go.

1.  More or less equal measures of the three fruits. In my garden the raspberries outnumber the other 2 so I would say 1lb of raspberries and anything above 1/2 lb each of the other two.

2.  If you have 2lbs of fruit then match that with 2lbs of cane sugar. I prefer cane to beet sugar but each to their own

Gently simmer the fruit for a good ten minutes, mashing with a potato masher ensure an even consistency. Some people don't like lumps of fruit in their jam.

Add the sugar - keep stirring and gently simmer for another ten minutes to fully blend.

Wind the heat right up to a rapid boil and check for setting point after about 5 minutes. I put a couple of dessert spoons in the freezer and test for setting point by putting some of the boiling jam into the cold spoon and when cooled, pushing the tip of you finger into it to see if the skin starts to form.

Heat up some clean, sterilised jars and when you are happy with the set jar it up, on with the lids or wax paper and cellophane and leave to cool.

You will not be disappointed.
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dimogga

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Re: Raspberry, Loganberry and Tayberry Jam
« Reply #1 on: July 12, 2015, 03:17:43 PM »

Yummy! I have been putting my tayberries and raspberries in the freezer as they're only ripening in small quantities at the moment.

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aftermidnight

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Re: Raspberry, Loganberry and Tayberry Jam
« Reply #2 on: July 12, 2015, 03:34:09 PM »

We had loads of raspberries again this year, all picked and in the freezer for now, I make my jams in the winter after the garden is finished for the year. We have wild blackberries all around us, a huge patch just across the street from us but the won't be ripe until the end of August beginning of September. I have a friend who has a quince tree so I begged some quince from her, juiced them and it's sitting in the freezer waiting until the apples on my neighbor's tree are ripe, then I just have to buy some cranberries grown locally here. I make a jelly from these three, nice accompaniment to chicken, we like it better than just plain old cranberry sauce.
Annette
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Big Gee

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Re: Raspberry, Loganberry and Tayberry Jam
« Reply #3 on: July 13, 2015, 03:11:25 PM »

Sounds lush Annette. A quince tree is something everyone who is a keen preserve maker should grow. Strange how they've gone out of fashion. If you're not on the hunt for pectin then the tree is worth growing for its attractive pale pink blossom and other ornamental qualities. They are also very hardy and can grow in quite harsh cold environments. Let's start a quince appreciation circle!  CW ;-)
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wonky

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Re: Raspberry, Loganberry and Tayberry Jam
« Reply #4 on: July 13, 2015, 04:47:38 PM »

That makes a lot of sense to me as well. I'm very tempted to remove the plum, greengage and apricot trees that I have and replace with a quince tree before they they get totally out of hand and unmanageable. They were a good idea at the time but are not setting any fruit worth talking about and growing at an alarming rate. A quince would be far more beneficial.
« Last Edit: July 13, 2015, 09:36:25 PM by wonky »
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Big Gee

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Re: Raspberry, Loganberry and Tayberry Jam
« Reply #5 on: July 13, 2015, 09:30:41 PM »

I'm not sure I'd cut anything like other fruit trees down to make room for one though.

My apricot and plum trees are laden down this year - in fact I've had to do a bit of culling because there are too many on there. I wonder what your problem is with the ones you've got Wonky? Pollination problems maybe?
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wonky

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Re: Raspberry, Loganberry and Tayberry Jam
« Reply #6 on: July 13, 2015, 09:58:30 PM »

The trees are still young and should pollinate each other but the apricot blossomed first followed by the greengage but unfortunately there was no blossom at all on the plum tree this year. I'm very unsure as to what the problem is but the blossom setting does appear to be a bit out of step. There is a plum tree on my neighbours plot which I think did blossom ok this year but not sure if that one is fruiting - I will have to check next time I go down. So far as I can see there is just one greengage fruit forming at the moment - nothing on the apricot or the plum. However I do have experience of a couple of pear trees in the garden at home which didn't set fruit for years but then after maybe as long as 10 years they suddenly started to fruit and have been prolific ever since. I don't think that in the local area there are many more fruit trees that would help with the pollination process as the allotments are fairly isolated with a large area of parkland behind and a paddock for horses in front followed by terraced housing so I bet the next nearest fruit trees will be quite some distance away.

A quince tree would as well as being a source of pectin for general jam making would also be spot on for some quince butter!
« Last Edit: July 15, 2016, 04:33:45 PM by wonky »
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Big Gee

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Re: Raspberry, Loganberry and Tayberry Jam
« Reply #7 on: July 14, 2015, 09:13:59 PM »

It looks as if sentence has been passed Wonky. From what you say it definately sounds like a lack of pollination partners - or all the bees have died in Yorkshire  what:-o
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Poppa Tommo

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Re: Raspberry, Loganberry and Tayberry Jam
« Reply #8 on: July 29, 2015, 09:13:11 PM »

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A quince tree would as well as being a source of pectin for general jam making would also be spot on for some quince butter!

I find that adding red curranats to strawberry Jam, for example, adds enough pecting for the setting, or, if you don't like the red currant skins then simmered and strained, using the liquor with the strawberries dose the job and a little acidic enhancement too.

Using white currants (or the juice, thereof) can also be used when the red colour is not needed.
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