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Offline wonky

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A possible prevention for blight
« on: March 02, 2015, 12:33:36 AM »
This appeared in Country Living magazine during 2014

ASPIRIN TREATMENT FOR TOMATO BLIGHT

The medical wonders of aspirin have long been applied to human beings, but it is now also being hailed as the latest cure for blight, which can completely ruin tomato and potato plants.
James Wong, author of Grow Your Own Drugs (Collins, £17.99), has revealed that he swears by the unusual practice. Similarly, scientists at the research arm of USDA (United States Department of Agriculture) discovered that salicylic acid, an aspirin-like compound prized for its pain-relieving effects, can prime plants to defend themselves against harmful bacteria.

The treatment will only be effective before blight takes hold, as it works to prepare the plant to defend itself from future attack. No use waiting for the first signs of infection to appear (shrivelled leaves and brown spotting).

The effects of this disease in tomato and tubers, staples of the edible plot, can mean a ruined harvest for keen grow-your-owners. This recent revelation could transform their fortunes with bumper harvests. Time to stock up the medicine cabinet – and the potting shed.

How to make the aspirin solution

Dissolve two soluble aspirin tablets in 4 litres of water
Simply fill a spray bottle with the solution and apply to the leaves of your tomato or potato crops two to three times a month
Wash any fruit you accidentally cover with the liquid before consumption

Wonky.

Offline spuds

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Re: A possible prevention for blight
« Reply #1 on: March 02, 2015, 09:16:54 AM »
very tempted to try this, was only going to grow earlies this year because of the blight
I get in main crop
Spuds (mick Ford)
is that the kettle I hear boiling
Newton Abbot Sunny Devon ( most times!)

Offline Big Gee

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Re: A possible prevention for blight
« Reply #2 on: March 02, 2015, 09:28:54 AM »
It sounds interesting, but I can't see the connection between salicylic acid (aspirin) and spores. Blight is a fungal disease that gets spread by fungal spores, it doesn't involve bacteria. But hey, I'm up for it when it comes to  anything that will fight the dreaded blight!
 

Offline Big Gee

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Re: A possible prevention for blight
« Reply #3 on: March 02, 2015, 09:55:29 AM »
I've just done a bit more research, and I've found the suggested answer to my query about how salicylic acid works with fungal infections. Apparently it triggers a defence response in the plants because it mimics a natural hormone that causes this reaction. VERY interesting! Check out the video (sorry in advance for the annoying pronunciation of 'tomAto'!)

<iframe width="640" height="385" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/RGnmaiHU8mw?fs=1&start=" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

Here's the write-up to accompany the video:


"How to Boost Your Tomatoes Defenses with Aspirin
The salacylic acid of aspirin mimics a hormone in tomato plants. If you do a Google search you will see a lot of documentation on this fact. The hormone naturally triggers a defense response in tomatoes. You are tricking your tomatoes into to triggering a defense response by  spraying it with aspirin. The theory is to induce a defense response before diseases arrive. You are boosting your tomatoes defenses BEFORE an attack of leaf spot or blight occur. I have done this for years and believe it works.


The Basic Recipe:

325 mg of aspirin to 1 gallon of water
Spray your tomatoes 2-3 times monthly

You have to use aspirin because you need the salacylic acid to mimic the hormone.

Observations:
I've been doing this for several years and notice thicker stronger tomato leaves. My non-scientific observation is that the aspirin triggers a response that makes the leave less susceptible to the spores of diseases. The spores have a harder time getting established. Try it out.

If you would like more information about using aspirin or want to join the great aspirin tomato experiment... check out my blog The Rusted Garden or go to this direct link on my blog  for some tomato fun The Great Tomato Aspirin Experiment of 2012"
 

Offline wrinkly1

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Re: A possible prevention for blight
« Reply #4 on: March 02, 2015, 02:32:42 PM »
it almost sounds too good to be true.  but what harm can it do to try it.we shall see results in the end year.  NTh:-)